Allison Day


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Our second day in Japan began with onigiri. Delicious, delicious onigiri.


Onigiri display at Mai Mai

We found an onigiri specialty shop in Shimbashi station (when facing the entrance to the JR lines, it’s in the far left corner) called Mai Mai.

(We went there so often, the woman who works there started bringing out the English menu whenever she saw us coming!)


Mai Mai

(And what is it with Japanese women taking pictures of posters? Every single time we passed this huge poster in the train station, there was always a group of girls/women standing in front of it, taking photos – no matter what time of day or night. I’m not exaggerating – there literally was not a single time we went by where there wasn’t at least one female (usually quite a few more) taking a picture of it.)


Every time we passed this, there were girls taking pictures of it.

So back to the onigiri. One thing we really loved about the onigiri at Mai Mai was that they used a mixed-grain rice for it.


Onigiri

It was delicious.


Yum.

The first time we went, we got an onigiri filled with mayo mixed with salmon, and an onigiri filled with miso paste. (The onigiri there are 220 yen each – about $2.75.)


Onigiri with mayonnaise salmon

I couldn’t tell you which I liked more, because they were both fantastic. Although now that I think about it, I’m still dreaming about that miso onigiri…


Onigiri with miso

There was a bakery in the train station that we passed by every day, called Kobeya Bakery.


Kobeya Bakery

Apparently they’re known for their mango hand pies, so of course we had to stop in and see how they were.


Display at the bakery

And while we were there, we could’t resist drooling over all the rest of their baked goods as well.


Display at the bakery


Display at the bakery

Once we made our purchases, we walked back to a nearby outdoor plaza that had plenty of seating.


Mango hand pie

It’s no wonder the mango hand pies are their specialty – they were fantastic! Not too sweet, and full of perfectly ripe mango.


Schoolchildren and a businessman sharing a bench

All sorts of people can be seen sharing a bench there – like a businessman trying to catch a quick nap, next to some schoolgirls enjoying a snack.


Upward view in the plaza

But the thing I was really excited about was the tonkatsu sandwich we also purchased from the bakery.


Tonkatsu sandwiches

Ever since Rachael and I recorded our Miso Hungry Podcast episode about tonkatsu, I’ve been wanting to try a katsu sando (tonkatsu sandwich).


Tonkatsu sandwiches

Hooooly cow. (Perhaps “holy pig” would be more appropriate in this case.)

I’m kind of obsessed.


Tonkatsu sandwiches

The katsu sando was made with perfectly fried tonkatsu and a tangy sauce between two soft pieces of white bread. So simple, yet so ridiculously freaking good.

(806 yen for the mango hand pie and katsu sando – about $10.40.)


So yummy!


Shimbashi Station

Back through the station…


Shimbashi Station

… and then we were off to our actual destination.


Takoyaki stand across the street from the Tokyo Dome

(Not this takoyaki stand, though there is takoyaki in our future!)


Architecture near the Tokyo Dome

No, we were headed to the Tokyo Dome that day. Though not normally much of a baseball fan, Son wanted to find a gift shop because there was some Japanese baseball team jersey he wanted to see if he could buy.


Grilled cod roe with mayo onigiri

But before wandering the Tokyo Dome, we found we were hungry again (something you’ll find to be a common theme of this trip) so we sat down to eat another onigiri that we had gone back to Mai Mai’s to get after we enjoyed the first two so much.

This time, the filling was grilled cod roe mixed with mayonnaise. Delicious.


Grilled cod roe with mayo onigiri

And then we got slightly (understatement of the century) sidetracked by a manga store that was right next to the food court we had sat down in.


Anime store

So… we’re kind of closet One Piece fans.


Allison holding the One Piece book we got

In the first few years we were going out, we spent a ton of time watching episodes of it together.


Manga

It’s unfortunately been a while since we’ve had time to watch, but I’ve been wanting to for a while.


Inside the anime store

Which meant it was pretty much impossibly not to buy the manga I was holding a few photos up… and a One Piece shaped ice tray. Heh.


Allison buying the book and ice tray

I’m going to be the Pirate King!


Allison standing with a Luffy statue

Aaaaanyways… after that minor distraction, we were off wandering again, trying to find the baseball gift shop Son had found online.


Tokyo Dome City

We wandered around Tokyo Dome City, finding some very interesting menus.


Allison looking at the Baseball Cafe menu

And some very interesting bugs. (I nearly sat on that!)


Weird bug

Finally we found the gift shop, attached to the Tokyo Dome (a baseball stadium).


Tokyo Dome

Unfortunately we didn’t find the jersey Son wanted, but it was definitely interesting to wander around.


Baseball souviner shop at Tokyo Dome


Tokyo Dome

Then we went to find more food. Of course.


Takoyaki shop

Like I said earlier, takoyaki was to be had today!


Takoyaki

Mmmm, takoyaki.


Takoyaki

Such a guilty pleasure. Just look at those huge pieces of octopus! (450 yen for 6 pieces – about $5.75)


Huge piece of octopus in the takoyaki

Son opted to get a salmon ochazuke. (750 yen – about $9.50)


Ochazuke shop

Ochazuke is a dish where you pour a hot liquid (I’ve mostly seen it with green tea, but this one had dashi) over a rice bowl.


Son's ochazuke

This is the first time I’ve seen it made with all these toppings, but it was fantastic!


Son's salmon ochazuke

Then it was back to the train station.


Train station

We love the train system in Japan.


Train station

Especially when there are little dessert shops right near the train tracks!


Dessert shop

This one was in Akihabara station, which I believe was the station nearest the Tokyo Dome.


Allison buying flan tart


Clock reads 15:22


Tart

A quarter of a flan-like tart cost us about $4.70.


View from the elevator in our hotel

After that it was back to the hotel for a nap, then we wandered around the area for a bit.


Interesting clock near our station

There’s some really interesting architecture near the Shimbashi station.


Our hotel

By then it was late enough that we just wanted to find something to eat and get back to sleep. (Yep, still a bit jet-lagged.)


Ueno station

Son decided he wanted to go check out Ueno station and see what they had there.

Japanese train stations almost always have an excellent selection of pretty gosh darned good food, whether it be in restaurants or take-out.


Ecute

Ecute is a little food mall in Ueno station that has a bunch of little stores selling a huge variety of both sweet and savory foods.


Shops inside Ecute

We looked around for a bit – there were so many options, it was hard to choose!


Bentos

But we finally decided on a bento box (1000 yen – about $13).


Buying a bento


More shops


Salads

After all the ramen and greasy foods (takoyaki and katsu sando aren’t exactly light foods!) of the past few days, I wanted something lighter, so I got a small salad as well.


Buying a salad

Back at the hotel we got into the food… I just love the bento boxes in Japan! So many interesting foods, you can’t possibly get bored with all that variety (and Son is obsessed with all the different kinds of rice).

The fish was fantastic, all the different tsukemono and types of rice were delicious, and I especially loved the little meatball – tsukune – in the lower right corner.


The bento we bought

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